Who’d want Scaramucci’s job now? In Trump’s White House, no one comes out alive

Whoever fills Scaramucci’s shoes will continue the circus anew before being sacrificed, in an oft-repeated ritual, on Trump’s altar

  • Lucia Graves is a Guardian US columnist

Anthony Scaramucci: it’s been a bad week. Photograph: Jonathan Ernst/Reuters

It’s been a very bad week for Anthony Scaramucci, who, after getting sacked from his marriage, got sacked from his job.

He’s dead even to his alma mater – Harvard law school’s alumni directory, in an erroneous report, apparently declared him deceased.

Anthony Scaramucci (10 days)

Named director of communications after having been denied a White House role earlier, the New York financier and Republican fundraiser promptly threatened to fire everyone in his team over leaks. He also staged a combative and contradictory briefing room debut and talkshow tour; sought to bat away questions about suspiciously liberal pronouncements in his past and support for Trump’s Republican enemies; deleted tweets; warred openly with the former chief of staff, Reince Priebus, and seemingly forced him out; compared the struggle to take healthcare away from millions of Americans to Lincoln’s battle against slavery; poured obscene invective about leakers, Priebus and Steve Bannon down the phone to a New Yorker reporter; missed the birth of his son; saw his wife file for divorce; and was asked to resign.

Michael Flynn (23 days)

Trump’s first national security adviser – one of four generals the president has employed – resigned after it was revealed he misled Vice-President Mike Pence over his contacts with Russians during the election campaign. It was later reported that Yates had warned the White House Flynn was vulnerable to Russian blackmail.

James Comey (110 days)

The most shocking firing of them all. Trump sacked his FBI director, by messenger rather than in person, as congressional and justice department investigations into links between Trump aides and Russia gathered pace. Lest anyone retain any doubt about why Trump pressed the big red button, he told NBC in a primetime interview the firing was tied to “this Russia thing”. The reverberations will be felt for some time yet.

Sean Spicer (183 days)

The long-suffering but loyal surrogate for the president handed in his resignationin response to Scaramucci’s appointment. A Republican insider and Priebus ally, he never settled into the press secretary role after an infamous debut in which he angrily insisted Trump’s fantastic version of…

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