U.S. 311 Bypass Project Leaves Property Owners With Questions, Concerns of Lost Value

“Home and property owners should know they have rights, and like any major financial or legal decision, should not just sign on the dotted line,” NC Eminent Domain Attorney Stan Abrams.

The U.S. 311 Bypass, a $62 million road project affecting more than 100 property owners, continues to displace and affect home and property owners in its path.

However, the offers some property owners receive from state officials may amount to far less than what their property is worth, according to former NCDOT attorneys at the NC Eminent Domain Law Firm. Rather than accepting these offers, owners may want to exercise often-misunderstood rights, including the ability to negotiate for a “second check.”

A seminar on Thursday evening, August 24, at 7 p.m. at the Courtyard by Marriott High Point will explore property owners’ rights at no cost to participants (more below).

Offers Below Value

At $62 million, this project is a major part of NCDOT’s annual roadway projects.

“In the case of this NCDOT project, home, property, and business owners may be left wondering if they will lose part or all of their property for pennies on the dollar,” said Stan Abrams, an attorney with the NC Eminent Domain Law Firm and former NCDOT attorney. “Home and property owners should know they have rights, and like any major financial or legal decision, should not just sign on the dotted line.”

Property owners in the path of this project will soon receive (or may have already received) purchase offers from state officials. According to Abrams, property owners should be careful – projects that have been so carefully considered can spare a few moments to ensure citizens get a fair shake.

“Homeowners receive a very official looking offer and think that is the ‘law’ for what they are able to receive,” Abrams said. “If an offer has been made, there may be a more complete and satisfactory offer to be gained through reappraisal and negotiations.”

“Second Check”

By North Carolina law, property owners whose land or businesses are targeted for acquisition ultimately receive an offer from the state. If the owner chooses not to accept the offer and takes no further steps, the state will still acquire the land and deposit the amount of the original…

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