Trump tweets he’s “impressed” with sanctions against North Korea

President Trump took to Twitter late Sunday night to announce that he had spoken with South Korean President Moon Jae-in.

Mr. Trump wrote: “Just completed call with President Moon of South Korea. Very happy and impressed with 15-0 United Nations vote on North Korea sanctions.”

The tweet came a day after the United Nations Security Council endorsed new sanctions on North Korea over Pyongyang’s recent tests of an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM).

The White House issued a statement to CBS News saying in part that the two leaders are “committed” to the sanctions and urge the international community to follow suit.

“The two leaders affirmed that North Korea poses a grave and growing direct threat to the United States, South Korea, and Japan, as well as to most countries around the world,” the statement read. “The leaders committed to fully implement all relevant resolutions and to urge the international community to do so as well.”

Meanwhile, a welcome boost came Sunday from China, the North’s economic lifeline, as Beijing called on its neighbor to halt its missile and nuclear tests.

For the U.S., it was a long-awaited sign of progress for Mr. Trump’s strategy of trying to enlist Beijing’s help to squeeze North Korea diplomatically and economically.

Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi, meeting with North Korea’s top diplomat during the gathering in Manila, urged the North to “maintain calm” despite the U.N. vote. “Do not violate the U.N.’s decision or provoke international society’s goodwill by conducting missile launching or nuclear tests,” Wang said, in an unusually direct admonition.

Tillerson didn’t meet with North Korea’s envoy, Ri Yong Ho. In fact, on his first day in Manila, Tillerson appeared to go out of his way to avoid crossing paths with Ri.

In remarks to reporters Monday morning, Tillerson said the best signal North Korea could give that it was prepared for negotiations with the U.S. would be to halt its missile launches.

Tillerson, in his most specific outline to date of what preconditions the U.S. had for talks with Pyongyang, said stopping the launches would be the “first and strongest signal.” But he also said it was not as simple as North Korea stopping launches for a few days or weeks. He wouldn’t give a concrete time frame but said…

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