Trump Promises A Tax Cut For The Middle Class, Guarantees One For The Rich

WASHINGTON ― President Donald Trump plans to unveil Wednesday what the White House is calling a “middle-class” tax cut but which at this point cuts taxes only for business owners and the wealthy.

Shareholders of corporations would enjoy a rate cut from the current maximum of 35 percent down to 20 percent, according to a White House briefing Tuesday. Owners of “small businesses,” who pay taxes on their individual returns rather than with a corporate filing, would pay no more than 25 percent, instead of the current maximum of 39.6 percent. And the wealthiest Americans would see that top 39.6 percent rate fall to 35 percent.

As for lower- and middle-class Americans, three Trump administration officials who spoke on the condition of anonymity would say only that Trump and House and Senate Republican leaders are promising to set rates and tax bracket thresholds so that those taxpayers would enjoy the most savings.

“This package is completely designed with the middle class in mind,” one of the officials said. “Tax relief in this package is focused on middle-class families.”

The details of how that would happen, though, is left to the House and Senate tax committees.

“We are not going to provide the specific income levels,” the official said. “We’re not trying to write a bill. We’re trying to provide a framework.”

The White House officials said the current seven tax brackets that range from 10 percent to 39.6 percent would be collapsed into three: 12 percent, 25 percent and 35 percent.

Most deductions apart from home mortgage interest and charitable deductions would be eliminated, including the deduction for state and local taxes, which currently provide a major break on federal income taxes for residents of coastal and high-tax states.

Also eliminated would be the personal exemptions, which let taxpayers deduct $4,050 per person in the household.

The White House officials said these would be offset by an increase in the standard deduction from the current $12,600 per married couple to $24,000 and an increase in the child tax credit from $1,000 to a higher level.

Still, how much and even whether this would provide an overall tax reduction for a family of four is unclear. Currently, that family starts out with at least $28,800 of income exempt from taxes, thanks to the standard deduction plus four exemptions. That figure is nearly $5,000 more than the $24,000 standard deduction the administration is touting.

“If they’re not going to…

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