Truckers Launch Media Blitz Across America Against December 18th Electronic Logging Device (“ELD”) Mandate.

James Lamb, the president of the Small Business in Transportation Coalition (“SBTC,”) a 501(C)(6) non-profit trucking industry trade group, announced on Monday that truckers across America in more than 40 locations including various truck stops held a one day trucking and mainstream media blitz to garner attention to their opposition to the mandatory implementation of Electronic Logging Devices (“ELDs”). Lamb’s SBTC participated in the event by issuing a statement to the media about the group’s efforts to postpone the upcoming December 18th ELD implementation pending the group’s petition to the Department of Transportation. Lamb has formally asked the Secretary to “stay” ELD implementation.

On November 20, 2017, Lamb (@SBTCInc) wrote a letter (published in its entirety on the SBTC website at http://smalltransportation.org/files/125976669.pdf) to Secretary of Transportation Elaine Chao (@SecElaineChao) on behalf of the smallest players in the industry, advising the SBTC felt the Department of Transportation’s sub agency –Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (“FMCSA”)– did not adequately assess the adverse economic impact of the new ELD rule on the smallest of businesses in the industry.

“…a reading of the FMCSA analysis suggests that FMCSA has essentially ignored and disregarded the impact on the smallest of industry players in an overbroad assessment that places one-man interstate owner-operators into the same category as other “small businesses” within the trucking industry. For instance, in referencing North American Industry Classification System (“NAICS”) codes 484110 through 484230 (Freight Trucking), the FMCSA makes no distinction whatsoever between businesses with annual revenues of $27.5 million and mere one-man operators of commercial motor vehicles,” Lamb said.

His letter also copies in the Small Business Administration and seeks they contact the Secretary and advocate on behalf of small business interests.

Lamb suggests that one man owner-operators should be afforded special consideration with respect to the specific economic and safety impacts on their operations as they do not enjoy the same “economies of scale” that the larger players enjoy:

“To a one man owner-operator, even a $27 million operation, which is technically classified as a “small business,” is distinctly…

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