Timeline: The saga of Meek Mill and how he ended up in jail

Meek Mill’s imprisonment on a probation violation has set off a flurry of legal appeals, criticism of the criminal justice system, newspaper opinion pieces, rallies, billboards and bus ads. A look at how the 30-year-old Philadelphia rapper, whose “Dreams Worth More Than Money” won a Billboard award for top rap album last year, ended up in a Pennsylvania prison roughly a decade after his 2007 arrest:

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HOW DID ALL THIS START?

JANUARY 2007: Mill is arrested in Philadelphia, charged with assault, drug and gun possession. According to a criminal complaint, he pointed a firearm at a police officer and was forcibly subdued.

AUGUST 2008: Mill is convicted of charges including simple assault, possession of a controlled substance with intent to deliver, possession of a loaded weapon.

JANUARY 2009: He is sentenced to 11? to 23 months behind bars, seven years of probation. Common Pleas Judge Genece Brinkley says the term was “considerably shorter” than it could have been. She wrote that the court wanted to “give him an opportunity to turn his life around from selling drugs and instead focus on his musical talent.”

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RELEASE AND PROBATION

JUNE 2009: Mill is released from jail after five months and paroled under house arrest. He is given permission to work but is also ordered to earn a high school equivalency diploma and undergo drug treatment.

2010-2012: On multiple occasions, he tests positive for marijuana and opioid use but is not held to be in violation of the terms of his release.

DECEMBER 2011: He is found to be in technical violation for testing positive for opioid use but is not jailed.

2012: After a court date is rescheduled several times because of Mill’s “unavailability and failure to communicate with his attorney,” Brinkley writes in a court document, his travel outside Philadelphia is suspended.

MARCH 2013: He is found in violation of probation for traveling outside the city but is not jailed. Instead, he is ordered to enroll in an etiquette course to address “inappropriate social media use and crude language in the courtroom,” court documents state.

JULY 2014: He violates probation again, this time for failing to report to his probation officer, making unauthorized travel plans and ignoring the court’s orders. He is returned to jail for about five months and given an additional five years of probation.

DECEMBER 2015: Mill is back in court for his fourth hearing for violations. Authorities say he didn’t report to his…

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