The Playlist: Pink Returns, Asking Questions With No Clear Answers

Pink’s first album since 2012 is due in October.CreditBalazs Mohai/MTI, via Associated Press

Every Friday, pop critics for The New York Times weigh in on the week’s most notable new songs and videos — and anything else that strikes them as intriguing. You can listen to this Playlist on Spotify here. Like this Playlist? Let us know at theplaylist@nytimes.com, and sign up for our Louder newsletter here.

Pink, ‘What About Us’

Pink has always been well suited to sing about messy love, but on “What About Us,” the first single from a new album due in October called “Beautiful Trauma,” she sings about a messy world. The “us” of the song isn’t a couple, but a collective that’s been misled by a “you” whose broken trust has led to disaster. The same piano figure continues through the song’s four-and-a-half minutes, swelling and retreating as she lets the emotion in her tremendous voice do the heavy lifting, shifting from wonder to frustration to anger. It’s catchy, thumpy and far more pleasurable than a Twitter rant. CARYN GANZ

Marshmello feat. Khalid, ‘Silence’

Here is a rare example of two artists tempering each other, and not for the worse. The young, contemplative soul singer Khalid brings the temperate side out of the D.J.-producer Marshmello, who can be frenetic, but here is soothing. And Marshmello gives Khalid a sturdier framework than he’s accustomed to, which might sandpaper down his appealing rough edges, but also pushes him toward grandeur. JON CARAMANICA

Frankie Rose, ‘Dyson Sphere’

Frankie Rose’s latest single, “Dyson Sphere,” could easily have slipped onto the soundtrack for “Atomic Blonde.” The title refers to a hypothetical structure that wraps itself around a star and sucks up its power; the song itself is an enrapturing dose of ethereal post-punk from the onetime Dum Dum Girls and Vivian Girls member’s fourth solo album, “Cage Tropical,” out today.

ASAP Ferg feat. Migos, ‘Nasty (Who Dat)’

First ASAP Ferg takes the 1999 Miami club anthem “Who Dat,” by JT Money, and distends it into something hollow and unsettling, then Migos show up with a brusqueness: Takeoff channeling N.W.A, Quavo at his choppiest, Offset enthusiastically virtuosic. J.C.

Nadia Sirota, ‘Letter O’

On “Tessellatum,” a long, minimalist suite, Ms. Sirota’s viola and Liam Byrne’s bass viols have a rough, windswept resonance. Ms. Sirota is a frequent collaborator with Nico Muhly — the closest thing contemporary…

Read the full article from the Source…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *