Terrible Twos Information

It can be scary to face the ‘terrible twos’ for the first time. Not only must you accept that your child (whom you remember being 7 pounds just a moment ago) is growing into a more independent person, but you also have to navigate the unfamiliar territory of ‘toddlerhood.’

The toddler phase isn’t bad: many parents love this phase and cherish the sweetness of this period in their child’s development. However, you may experience difficulties associated with children aged two to four. They can be emotional and throw tantrums when something doesn’t go according to their expectations.

If you’re feeling frustrated or anxious, that’s okay. Don’t decide that you’ve become a bad parent because of this kind of behavior – with time, it will get better. This time in your toddler’s life is difficult for her as well as for you, and both of you need to navigate it as well as you can.

Your child is learning and changing both mentally and physically. It’s hard for him to process all the new experiences, and the more complex emotions of toddlerhood can be overwhelming. Here are some suggestions to avoid common problems with ‘the terrible twos.’

1. Your child wants to do things his way. That’s okay – let him do it, and be there for him so he can succeed at his little adventures. If you can learn to adapt to some of the eccentricities of your toddler, you’re on your way to breezing through the terrible twos.

2. Spend time with your child. At this age, children feel nervous about the world and they need your support to help them navigate it. When your toddler asks you something or shows you something, it will only take twenty to thirty seconds. Interrupt yourself to accommodate this, and your child will feel loved and at peace with you. Quality time doesn’t mean ten minutes a day – your child won’t be a toddler forever! Cherish this time with him.

3. Pent-up feelings cause tantrums. Toddlers don’t have tough jobs or taxes to pay, but they can still experience stress and negative emotions. More importantly, your toddler isn’t used to these feelings, so they can become more serious more quickly. When he doesn’t know how to process his feelings anymore, they will explode in the form of a tantrum. When this happens, try to keep quiet and let him ‘let it out.’

4. You can strategically ignore certain things to help fix your child’s behavior. For instance, some toddlers say ‘damn,’ even though no one else has said it….

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