SkillsUSA Members Joined by Secretary of Education in Support of Career and Technical Education

Skilled, capable and flexible workers are the backbone of our economy, and this event allows us to rally support for our SkillsUSA students and training programs nationwide.

Students representing career and technical education (CTE) programs in 29 states met with congressional representatives Sept. 26 after hearing the Secretary of Education call SkillsUSA “an integral part of their educational experience.”

The students were attending the annual Washington Leadership Training Institute (WLTI) to learn to be better advocates for public career education. During the Sept. 23-27 event, they visited their congressional representatives and paid respects at Arlington National Cemetery’s Tomb of the Unknowns as well as the Pentagon 9/11 Memorial. The annual WLTI, with 506 attendees, was the largest in SkillsUSA’s 52-year history.

“SkillsUSA represents America’s future skilled workforce,” explained Tim Lawrence, executive director of SkillsUSA. “Nations rise on the success of their workforce. Skilled, capable and flexible workers are the backbone of our economy, and this event allows us to rally support for our SkillsUSA students and training programs nationwide.”

The SkillsUSA group met at Upper Senate Park near the U.S. Capitol for a briefing with Betsy DeVos, U.S. Secretary of Education. Also meeting the students from the Education department were Kim R. Ford, acting assistant secretary for Career, Technical and Adult Education; and Sharon Miller, director of the Division of Academic and Technical Education.

Secretary DeVos had a powerful message for SkillsUSA members. “You know CTE shares overwhelming bipartisan support … as well as very strong support from our president,” she said. “This administration believes students need a full menu of options, whether you choose to pursue a rigorous technical training program leading to a well-paying job in a high-demand field or a two-year or four-year college degree program. You must know that there are multiple pathways to pursue your education after your high school diploma.

“We believe students — and their parents — need to better understand what all of those options are, and how to connect with them, including technical schools, community colleges…

Read the full article from the Source…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *