Razors, syringes and batteries: The toys that Rohingya children play with

Thousands of Rohingya people arrive daily at refugee camps in the Cox Bazar district of Bangladesh. The vast majority are women, including mothers with newborn babies, and children.

Ed Jones, a staff photographer for Agence France-Presse, spent two weeks at one of these refugee camps.

He photographed children playing with everyday objects — a razor blade, plastic syringe and a bottle cap — as toys.

Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images
Rohingya migrant girl Halima Khatun (6), who arrived in Bangladesh in October, holds a whistle and a razor blade that she uses as toys at the Shamlapur refugee camp in Cox’s Bazar, Dec. 1, 2017.
Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images
Rohingya migrant boy Mohhamad Hussein (10), who arrived in Bangladesh in October, holds a discarded syringe that he was playing with at the Thankhali refugee camp in Cox’s Bazar, Dec. 2, 2017.
Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images
Rohingya migrant boy Shahidul Amin (5), who arrived in Bangladesh in September, holds a part of a bottle that he uses to play in the sand at the Thankhali refugee camp in Cox’s Bazar, on Dec. 2, 2017.

“The imagination of children is a magnificent thing, yet no children should ever have to resort to playing with items like these,” he said.

He continued, “The razor-blade was slightly unusual. But many kids were playing with items that has previously been of use to adults. This razor blade was completely blunt. The child was not able to tell me where they found it.”

Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images
Rohingya migrant boy Abdul Hafez (5), who arrived in Bangladesh in September, holds bottle tops that he uses to play a game called ‘Medakhela’ at the Thankhali refugee camp in Cox’s Bazar, Dec. 2, 2017.

He explained how an old bottle top became a favorite toy for the children.

“Used as a funnel by adults and children to fill water jugs and other vessels, kids are using them to play in the sand, along with mini sieves (presumably used originally for straining tea etc.), and also old plastic cartons that they attach string to and fill with sand and dirt to use as rudimentary cars,” he said.

Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images
Rohingya migrant boy Saiful Islam (9), who fled Myanmar three years ago, holds a toy gun at the Shamlapur refugee camp in Cox’s Bazar, Dec. 1, 2017.
Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images
Rohingya migrant boy Mohammad Rafiq (8), who fled Myanmar in October, holds a toy whistle at the Shamlapur refugee camp in Cox’s Bazar, Dec. 1, 2017.

Jones said he “thought about including a portrait of the face of each child…

Read the full article from the Source…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *