Protesters in wheelchairs removed by police after disrupting Graham-Cassidy bill hearing

Protesters in wheelchairs were removed from a hearing on the Republican health care bill Monday afternoon after disrupting the session with chants of “No cuts to Medicaid! Save our liberty!”

The disruption prompted Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, to adjourn the session until the protesters could be cleared out.

“If you want a hearing — if you want a hearing, you better shut up,” Hatch said.

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
Capitol Police drag a blind protester out of a Senate Finance Committee hearing about the proposed Graham-Cassidy Healthcare Bill in the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill, Sept. 25, 2017, in Washington.

Capitol Police officers struggled to remove people, with some sliding out of their wheelchairs and onto the floor.

People from all over the country, all of walks of life, lined up as early as 5 a.m., to urge lawmakers to oppose the latest Republican health care bill, known as the Graham-Cassidy bill.

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
Capitol Police remove a protester in a wheel chair from a Senate Finance Committee hearing about the proposed Graham-Cassidy healthcare bill in the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill, Sept. 25, 2017, in Washington.

The chambers of Finance Committee is set to consider health care legislation proposed by Sens. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., Bill Cassidy, R-La., Dean Heller, R-Nev., and Ron Johnson, R-Wis.

This is the one and only open hearing scheduled on the Graham-Cassidy bill, an unusual process that opponents of the bill, like Sen. John McCain, have objected to.

Susan Walsh/AP
Protesters lay on the floor as they wait to be arrested by Capitol Police as they attempt to maintain order in the hallways on Capitol Hill in Washington, Sept. 25, 2017.

An army veteran who came all the way from Atlanta called the hearing a “fake” and a “facade,” accusing lawmakers of not listening to real Americans.

Through tears, Pam Willis of Wyoming told ABC News’ Mary Bruce that this is a matter of “life and death.”

J. Scott Applewhite/AP
Capitol Police maintain order as hundreds of people, many with disabilities, arrive for a Senate Finance Committee hearing on the last-ditch GOP push to overhaul the nation’s health care system, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Sept. 25, 2017.

“My daughter’s coming in a wheelchair and it means her life, the insurance. And my daughter in law has cancer, her fourth cancer and it means her life too,” Willis said. “It means a lot.”

Read the full article from the Source…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *