Pregnancy and childbirth too often are lethal in America

The U.S. failure on maternal mortality is particularly striking because around the world, maternal mortality has plunged by almost half since 1990; the U.S. is a rare country in which maternal deaths have become more common in recent years.

HOUSTON — We love mothers, or at least we say we do, and we claim that motherhood is as American as apple pie.

We’re lying. In fact, we’ve structured health care so that motherhood is far more deadly in the United States than in other advanced countries. An American woman is about five times as likely to die in pregnancy or childbirth as a British woman — partly because Britain makes a determined effort to save mothers’ lives, and we don’t.

Here in Texas, women die from pregnancy at a rate almost unrivaled in the industrialized world. A woman in Texas is about 10 times as likely to die from pregnancy as one in Spain or Sweden, and by all accounts, the health care plans proposed so far by Republicans would make maternal mortality even worse in Texas and across America.

Women die unnecessarily in Texas for many reasons, but it doesn’t help that some women’s health clinics have closed and that access to Medicaid is difficult.

I spent a day in Houston shadowing Dr. Lisa Hollier, the president-elect of the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, in her Center for Children and Women. Hollier is on a mission to make motherhood safer, because of an experience she had as a young medical resident many years ago.

Amy, 23, had arrived at the hospital with a headache near the end of an uncomplicated pregnancy. Her husband was there, and everything seemed normal — and then Amy collapsed and lost consciousness.

Doctors performed an emergency C-section and saved the baby, a daughter, and Hollier struggled to keep Amy alive. She failed. Amy had suffered a preventable massive stroke, related to severe high blood pressure.

“I remember her husband,” Hollier said, and she wiped her eyes at the memory. “Here’s this dad, and it’s supposed to be the happiest day of his life, and there’s this look on his face. He’s just so lost.”

That happens somewhere in the United States on average twice a day.

My day with Hollier underscored that there’s one very simple and inexpensive starting point: Help women and girls avoid pregnancies they don’t want. “You can’t die from a pregnancy when you’re not pregnant,” Hollier noted.

Almost half of pregnancies in…

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