Popular PAINWeek Panel Discussion “The Medical Stasi” Returns to 2017 National Conference Along With Timely Pain and Chemical Dependency Course

the Medical Stasi returns and will examine the clinical implications of urine drug testing in the management of chronic pain patients using opioid class drugs.

PAINWeek®—the largest US pain conference for frontline practitioners—is celebrating its 11th annual meeting. Returning will be the Medical Stasi, this year discussing the “Perils and Pitfalls of Excessive Urine Drug Testing.” Presenter Douglas Gourlay, MD, MSc, FRCPC, FASAM, comments, “Last year, PAINWeek launched the first of Medical Stasi session: a panel discussion format that explored the impact of risk management on the therapeutic relationship between clinicians and their patients. During this session, key opinion leaders in the clinical, ethical, as well as legal domains debated core issues in risk management. This year, the Medical Stasi returns and will examine the clinical implications of urine drug testing in the management of chronic pain patients using opioid class drugs. We will cover medical necessity, patient centered testing, and conflict of interest resolution through a combination of both moderated Q&A and attendee Q&A.”

The session will be presented on Friday, September 8. This year’s participants will be Dr. Gourlay; Howard Heit, MD, FACP, FASAM; Gary Reisfeld, MD; and Jennifer Bolen, JD. Paul Christo, MD, MBA, will moderate.

Also on that day, the “Common Threads in Pain and Chemical Dependency” session will “explore the changing face of substance use disordered individuals who suffer from problematic use of legitimately prescribed medications for the treatment of their underlying chronic pain condition.” Dr. Gourlay continues, “Clearly, there is a prescription drug problem in America, but the face of drug addiction may be changing. Unlike the alcohol and drug dependent patients seeking treatment in the past, many of today’s patients are struggling with legitimate (if not always appropriate) medication use that is arguably ‘doing more to the patient than for the patient,’ and yet they continue to use. In this context, we offer presentations examining the concepts of problematic medication/drug use from the perspectives of outpatient as well as inpatient management of this often challenging and heterogenous group of pain…

Read the full article from the Source…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *