Photographing the solar eclipse: What you need to know

Getting a photo of the solar eclipse on August 21 won’t be as easy as taking any other picture, experts say.

“[Taking a photo] can ruin your phone or your camera,” Carnegie Science Center Planetarium Manager Mike Hennessy told Fox News.

NASA and the Carnegie Science Center give tips on how to take a photo without hurting your eyesight or ruining your phone’s camera. 

Use a solar filter: 

“This best thing to do is to cover the camera lens with a solar filter during the moments before (and after) totality when the sunlight is still blinding,” NASA explains, in its guidelines. “This will eliminate sun blooming and give you a clear image of the solar disk.”

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It’s okay to take off the filter only during totality, according to NASA.

A pair of ISO-Certified sun-viewing glasses can be used to cover the smarphone lens, NASA says, adding that sunglasses should not be used to cover the lens.

“It is a good idea to set up your smartphone on a tripod or one of those wrap-around mountings so that you can fix the angle of the shot before the eclipse starts,” NASA explains. “The sun disk will be small enough that you will want to avoid the inevitable shaking that occurs when holding the camera. When totality starts, take the filter off and shoot normally with the smartphone.”

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NASA notes that you will only have 2.5 minutes or less to take photos of the eclipse, and…

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