Office-Based Anesthesia Proves Safe in Pediatric Dentistry

Anesthesia Progress Volume 64, Issue 3

Anesthesia-based treatment is both safe and effective in pediatric dentistry.

Anesthesia Progress – As the number of children receiving treatment for dental decay has increased, so has the need for safe and effective anesthesia during such procedures. However, records of the success of ambulatory anesthesia in pediatric dentistry have almost always been non-existent. The recent inception of a database recording the demographics and success rates of ambulatory anesthesia in pediatric dental treatments now allows researchers to examine said statistics. Based on previous records, researchers have provided a secondary analysis that goes into more depth regarding the outcomes of pediatric dental procedures.

Researchers from the Indiana University School of Dentistry and the Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis recently published a study in the current issue of Anesthesia Progress that examines outcomes of pediatric dental procedures involving ambulatory anesthesia. The data examined came from the Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia Clinical Outcomes Registry; a database that allows ambulatory physician and dentist anesthesiologists to examine patient demographics and procedural outcomes. The authors of the study provided a secondary analysis of data collected in the database from 2010–2014.

A total of 7,041 were reviewed, with children ranging in age from under 6 years old to 18 years old. Of those children, 5,960 (84.6%) were younger than 6 years old, 816 (11.5%) were between 7 and 12 years old, and 265 (3.76%) were between 13 and 18 years old. The researchers focused on three categories of adverse events resulting from anesthesia: those that occurred predischarge, postdischarge, or any adverse occurrence (including those occurring both predischarge and postdischarge).

The review showed that the most common predischarge event was laryngospasm (0.5%), a vocal cord spasm that makes it difficult to speak or breathe, followed by post-operative nausea or vomiting requiring pharmaceutical treatment (0.4%), and 0.17% of events were listed as “other.” In the postdischarge analysis, 5% experienced nausea, 3.26% reported vomiting, and 0.3% reported…

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