More than 600 Youth, Wounded Warfighters and Adults with Disabilities Helped through $220,000 Anthem Foundation Grant to Disabled Sports USA

Adaptive skiing has not only allowed me to be physical again, but it has also allowed me to spend more fun time with my kids on the slopes.

More than 600 youth, wounded warfighters and adults with disabilities will benefit from rehabilitation programs in sports and recreation in eight states thanks to a $220,000 grant from the Anthem Foundation, the philanthropic arm of Anthem, Inc., to Disabled Sports USA (DSUSA).

Since 2011, the Anthem Foundation has provided DSUSA and its chapters with more than $1 million in grants for adaptive sports programming in more than 50 different winter and summer sports, including: skiing, snowboarding, golf, kayaking, rafting, cycling, rock climbing, scuba diving, fishing, surfing, sailing, and more.

The grant provides local adaptive sports opportunities to wounded warfighters, adults and youth with disabilities by supporting the following DSUSA chapters: Adaptive Sports and Recreation Association in California, National Sports Center for the Disabled in Colorado, Turnstone Center for Children and Adults with Disabilities in Indiana, Wheelchair Sports, Inc. in Kansas, Disabled Athlete Sports Association in Missouri, Maine Adaptive Sports & Recreation in Maine, STRIDE Adaptive Sports in New York, and The Adaptive Adventure Sports Coalition in Ohio. This grant will help participants learn adaptive sports while achieving and sustaining physical activity levels leading to a healthy lifestyle, as recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Youth and adults with disabilities are much more likely to be physically inactive, due to the lack of access to adaptive equipment, specialized instruction and accessible facilities. This results in much higher risks for obesity and health-related diseases. A Harris Interactive research study of more than 1,000 adults with disabilities showed that those who participate in DSUSA adaptive sports programs were significantly happier, healthier and more likely to be employed than those who do not participate in adaptive sports.

“Adaptive skiing has not only allowed me to be physical again, but it has also allowed me to spend more fun time with my kids on the slopes,” said Don Tallman who, after serving nearly 20 years in the Marine Corps and Army, was…

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