MoCADA and the Tenth Magazine Set To Discuss Social Justice and the Black Queer Identity at Art on the Vine 2017

This is what Art on the Vine is all about. We are bringing together a melting pot of people to further expose them to art and discuss topics that are relevant to our everyday life.

Leading up to the 2017 exhibition in Martha’s Vineyard, Art on the Vine (AOTV) is pleased to announce its full roster of exhibiting artists as well as new sponsors the Museum of Contemporary African Diasporan Arts (MoCADA), the Tenth Magazine, Total Wine & More, Espolon Tequila, and Wanderluxxe. MoCADA and the Tenth Magazine will lead engaging panel discussions on social justice issues and the black queer identity featuring prominent artists, curators, and collectors. Also, inaugural AOTV resident Nate Lewis will reveal work produced during his four-week residency throughout June and July in Martha’s Vineyard.

Art on the Vine presented by The Agora Culture takes place on August 12-14 at the Dr. Daniel Fisher House in Edgartown, MA. This three-day cultural explosion includes panel discussions on current events, museum-quality art for purchase, and networking opportunities with art enthusiasts and multicultural artists on the rise.   

“We are excited to have such high caliber artists and organizations join us for our second annual exhibition,” said founder Jessica Stafford Davis. “This is what Art on the Vine is all about. We are bringing together a melting pot of people to further expose them to art and discuss topics that are relevant to our everyday life.”

The Tenth Magazine will host Outside the Frame on August 13th at 1:30 p.m. This panel discussion will question categories of race, gender and sexuality, while celebrating a community whose politics and art forms have historically, and continually are used as a medium to awaken social consciousness both outside, and from within the Black community. As art is simply a by-product of the process of creation, interrogation and reflection, how does the Black queer identity which has largely been invisible, yet quietly organizing in the face of multiple oppressions, now arise to share spaces of constraint and freedom? As there is a fervent conversation taking place concerning the visibility of collectors and artists of color in an industry where white paragons control the spatial…

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