International Essential Tremor Foundation to Host Teleconference on Children and ET

This teleconference series is just one way the IETF actively works to create awareness of the condition, fund critical, ground-breaking scientific research and offer support to those affected by this life-altering condition.

The International Essential Tremor Foundation (IETF) will host its next call in a free educational telephone conference series focusing on a different topic each session on the life-altering neurological condition called essential tremor (ET). This teleconference call will feature the topic Children and ET and will take place on Tuesday, Oct. 10 at 2 p.m. PST / 3 p.m. MST/ 4 p.m. CST/ 5 p.m. EST. An expert in ET care and research will provide up-to-date information in a teleconference format followed by a question-and-answer period. Questions must be submitted in advance at the time of registration. Registrations are limited and required. More information and registration is available at 888.387.3667 or http://www.essentialtremor.org/seminars.

The IETF has teamed-up with world-class neurologists and experts to host a one-hour call featuring presentations by doctors on the past and current essential tremor research and outcomes, and the future prospects for better treatments and a cure. Participants simply call in to the number provided at registration and hear experts discuss the latest news on a variety topics involving ET from the comfort of their home. No computer or Internet access is needed. Speakers include:


  • Keith Coffman, MD – Clinical Director of Neurology; Director, Movement Disorders Clinic; Director, Tourette Syndrome Center of Excellence; Children’s Mercy Hospital
  • Facilitator – Patrick McCartney, IETF Executive Director

“This teleconference series is just one way the IETF actively works to create awareness of the condition, fund critical, ground-breaking scientific research and offer support to those affected by this life-altering condition,” IETF Executive Director Patrick McCartney said.

ET, which affects nearly 10 million people in the U.S., is the most common neurological movement disorder, but is frequently misdiagnosed as Parkinson’s disease. The condition is often characterized by rhythmic, involuntary and uncontrollable shaking of the hands and arms during movement,…

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