Immigration Attorney Majid Foroozandeh Educates Illegals on Adjusting Legal Status

Immigration Attorney Majid Foroozandeh

It’s a case-by-case basis for each individual, but someone who is ‘illegal’ should not be afraid to talk to an attorney about their situation in an attempt to see if there is a way that he or she can adjust his or her status to be in the U.S. legally.

According to a May 24, 2017, article in The Hill, the Trump administration’s proposed budget includes significant reforms to immigration law that would amount to a crackdown on sanctuary cities. The issue, however, is Trump’s authority to impose punishment for noncompliance with a federal statute.

Section 1373 of Title VIII of the United States Code says that states and municipalities may not prohibit their employees from sharing a person’s immigration status with the immigration authorities. Trump’s executive order declares that any jurisdiction willfully failing to comply with Section 1373 is “not eligible to receive federal grants.”

“However, there is no clear, legal definition for ‘sanctuary cities.’ That alone makes the order problematic. Additionally, there is a contention as to if the president has the executive power to withhold federal funding to force municipalities or states to affirmatively share information on illegals,” noted Majid Foroozandeh, an Irvine-based immigration attorney and founder of the Law Offices of Foroozandeh, APC. “For individuals who are illegal, sanctuary cities and federal funding pose a new legal conundrum. For now it is just ‘smoke and mirrors.’ The real issue is that we need an immigration reform.”

The issue still stands that illegal status must be addressed. “It’s a case-by-case basis for each individual, but someone who is ‘illegal’ should not be afraid to talk to an attorney about their situation in an attempt to see if there is a way that he or she can adjust his or her status to be in the U.S. legally,” added Foroozandeh.

In fact, the attorney-client privilege protects the individual with illegal status. “Status may be adjusted by sponsorship by an employer, marriage to a U.S. citizen, and having children over the age of 21, by application of waivers of Grounds of Inadmissibility, to name a few. I am simplifying it, but you…

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