How Long to Find the One? Five Minutes on a Dating Site

“My mother was a quilter,” Ms. Bilik said. “I grew up quilting and sewing and making with her — that’s a large part of my identity and a lot of what Knock Knock grew out of.”

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The couple after the ceremony. “You are the best chance I ever took on love,” the groom said during their ceremony. “You’re the one thing I ever did right.”

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Jason Lecras for The New York Times

Mr. Rosenberg and his sister, Julie, were raised by their mother in Los Angeles. A little more than a month before Ms. Bilik and Mr. Rosenberg’s wedding, Julie died at age 43. “We were like twins,” Mr. Rosenberg said. “It was always just the two of us.”

Ms. Bilik’s 30s were consumed by 90-hour workweeks, which left little time for courtships. With the big 4-0 looming and no promising life partners in sight, she began in vitro fertilization. “I actually thought life might not be worth living if I didn’t have children,” she said.

After a year of unsuccessful treatments, Ms. Bilik started the process anew, this time with an egg donor. When the donor she chose fell through, she was surprisingly relieved.

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The mother of the groom giving a speech during the reception.

Credit
Jason Lecras for The New York Times

“That’s what told me, ‘I think I’m going to be O.K. not having kids,’” she said. “Since I was 25, I had been dating to find my baby daddy. But I had done therapy and other kinds of personal work. I finally accepted that my mother had died, that my family wasn’t what I wanted it to be, that I wasn’t a skinny model. And I started to have fun. It was a new thing for me, not feeling like each person was my last best hope, but rather there’s more where that came from.”

At the same time, Mr….

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