How Edgar Ramirez transformed himself into Gianni Versace

Edgar Ramirez as Gianni Versace for FX’s latest installment of “American Crime Story”.Jeff Daly/FX

A few months before fashion designer Gianni Versace was murdered on the steps of his Miami Beach villa by serial killer Andrew Cunanan, then-20-year-old Edgar Ramirez visited his parents in the sun-kissed party city. “If you walked on Ocean Drive, you could feel the vitality and the energy,” the Venezuelan actor tells Alexa of those freewheeling days in 1997. “It was exhilarating, it was exuberant.”

Ramirez, now 40, is revisiting that glamorous — and tragic — time. The actor plays the legendary Italian couturier on FX’s 10-episode “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story,” premiering on Jan. 17.

It’s a departure for the square-jawed screen star, who has become a Hollywood go-to for variations on masculine archetypes: a deadbeat ex-husband opposite Jennifer Lawrence in “Joy”; a CIA operative in “Zero Dark Thirty” and Panamanian boxing legend Roberto Durán at the center of “Hands of Stone,” a biopic also starring Robert De Niro and Usher.

While Ramirez transformed himself into fighting shape for “Hands of Stone,” dieting and training for hours a day in Panama City gyms, he went in the opposite direction for his fashion-designer role. The normally fit leading man packed on 20 pounds, the Italian way — by indulging in endless plates of pasta — and used prosthetics for the first time. Sporting a receding hairline, graying coiffure, three-day stubble and a generous physique, he bears an uncanny resemblance to the late designer.

Cutting the weight is proving less enjoyable. “Now is when the fun part is over,” he says with a slightly gloomy tone in his voice. “Because I gotta lose it.”

Versace blazer, similar styles $2,650 at Farfetch; Turtleneck, $650 at VersaceWilliams & Hirakawa

His preparation for the part also included speaking to close friends of Versace, whose private life stood in stark contrast to the glorious excess of his brand’s image. “[People] remember the lush exuberance of the clothes and the sex appeal and the sexuality and the models and the parties,” Ramirez says. “But on the real, personal side, he was not a party animal. He used to go to bed very early and get up very early as well. It was very interesting to discover that side of him.”

Ramirez gained a newfound respect for the refined artist during his preparation. “He was a very cultivated man. He used…

Read the full article from the Source…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *