Gary Cohn Falsely Claims Wealthy Won’t Benefit From Trump Tax Plan

With a straight face on ABC’s ”Good Morning America” on Thursday, President Donald Trump’s chief economic adviser Gary Cohn said that the administration’s tax plan doesn’t offer a tax cut to the wealthy.

But the plan unveiled by the Trump administration Wednesday clearly tells a different story. The rich ― and also corporations, which are technically people according to the Supreme Court ― are by far the biggest beneficiaries of the preliminary outline released by the White House.

Initially, Cohn tried to evade George Stephanopoulos’ questions on how the rich would benefit under Trump’s tax plan, but finally at the close of the interview he just seemed to give in to the untruth.

“Will the wealthy get a tax cut or not?” Stephanopoulos pressed.

“The wealthy are not getting a tax cut under our plan,” said Cohn, who is the director of the National Economic Council and is leading the push for tax cuts. The former Goldman Sachs president was also in the running for Federal Reserve chair before he openly criticized the president’s equivocal remarks on white supremacy.

Though the Trump administration’s plan is sketchy on key details ― including information on a much-ballyhooed child care tax credit ― as proposed thus far, the plan is a big fat kiss to the wealthy.

A stunning 80 percent of the so-called “tax relief” in Trump’s plan would go to households in the top 1 percent income bracket, according to a rough analysis  released Wednesday by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, a progressive think tank.

The top 1 percent of income earners would get a $150,000 tax cut, on average, according to the center. But the real winners would be the tippy top income earners. Households making more than $3.8 million would see their tax bills drop by about $800,000 a year or 21 percent, the report found.

Meantime, a married couple with one child making $48,000 a year would get a tax cut of… wait for it… $180. 

In his interview with Stephanopoulos, Cohn refused to even say that all middle-class Americans would get a tax break under his plan ― even as he claimed that the plan was good for working families. 

“I can’t guarantee everything,” Cohn said, noting that you’ll always find an exception to “every rule.”

He estimated that median-income households (those earning $55,000) would get a tax cut of between $650 – $1,000.

The plan doesn’t include the kind of tax cuts that would guarantee real savings for working…

Read the full article from the Source…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *