Florida Hospital and the American Heart Association Inspire Women to Share Their Stories on Heart Disease and Stroke

Florida Hospital Pepin Heart Institute’s Dr. Charles Lambert with the 2017 Go Red For Women Real Women of Tampa Bay

“There are certain factors that affect only women such as pregnancy and female hormones that may put them at greater risk for heart disease.

Florida Hospital officially announced its continued sponsorship of the American Heart Association Go Red For Women Casting Call for the second consecutive year. The Association’s Casting Call empowers women to serve as health advocates by providing them a forum to create awareness by sharing their compelling personal stories of how they have been affected by heart disease and stroke. These brave women also contribute to a remarkable cause that promotes long-term heart healthy behaviors. According to the Association, every minute someone’s wife, mother, daughter or sister dies from heart disease, stroke or another form of cardiovascular disease (CVD).

Cardiovascular diseases have reached alarming and epidemic proportions. In fact, more women die from heart disease and stroke than men and too many women die each year because they are unaware that heart disease is their number one killer. The silver lining is that 80 percent of these cases can be prevented through education on making healthy lifestyle choices. The single most important action that women can take is to “know your numbers,” which includes being aware of blood pressure, cholesterol, blood sugar and body mass index. These numbers are important because they help medical providers determine a patient’s risk of developing angina, heart attack, stroke and peripheral artery disease. Other preventative measures to help prevent CVD are eating right, maintaining a healthy weight, staying active and stopping smoking.

“There are certain factors that affect only women such as pregnancy and female hormones that may put them at greater risk for heart disease. In addition, connective tissue diseases, coronary spasm, Takotsubo cardiomyopathy and associated heart failure are just a few examples of specific conditions surrounding heart disease that are more prevalent in women than in men. Furthermore, women tend to be underdiagnosed and undertreated when compared to men,” said Dr. Charles Lambert,…

Read the full article from the Source…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *