FlexJobs Reveals 15 Surprising Findings About People Interested in Flexible Work

There is a much broader diversity in the types of people who want and/or need flexible work–especially telecommuting, flexible, and/or part-time schedules–than is commonly recognized when looking at the workforce, said Sara Sutton Fell, founder and CEO of FlexJobs

FlexJobs’ recent 6th annual survey of more than 5,500 people interested in flexible work has provided new and surprising insights into how and why work flexibility matters. While some findings were not too shocking (for example: workers are most interested in 100% telecommuting, people think they are more productive working from home instead of the office, and the majority have left or considered leaving a job because it did not offer flexible work options), other findings were more surprising.

“There is a much broader diversity in the types of people who want and/or need flexible work–especially telecommuting, flexible, and/or part-time schedules–than is commonly recognized when looking at the workforce. This is largely because many historical and antiquated stigmas continue to fuel misconceptions about what flexible jobs are and who wants them. For example, only working parents want flexibility, work-from-home jobs are all scams, or working flexibly will hurt your career prospects,” said Sara Sutton Fell, founder and CEO of FlexJobs. “But the response from our survey showed that the interest in flexible work spans generations, educational backgrounds, and career levels, and that the respondents associated themselves with a wide variety of groups, such as introverts, entrepreneurs, digital nomads, people living in a rural areas, students, and those managing health issues. There are a variety of reasons people from all walks of life seek work flexibility, and working outside the traditional 9-to-5 office is not a ‘nice to have’ but a true necessity for many of them,” Sutton Fell concluded.

Here are 15 surprising findings about people interested in flexible work:

Demographics:

  • Flexible work is not just important to working parents. Highlighting the broad appeal of work flexibility, 40% of the 5,500+ respondents did not have children. While working parents are certainly helping drive the flexibility trend, there are plenty of job seekers without children that seek…

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