Federal Communications Commission Approves Notice of Inquiry (NOI) on the SHAKEN Call Authentication Framework Developed by the SIP Forum/ATIS NNI Task Force

With this NOI, the FCC is taking a decisive step towards the goals of better protecting American consumers from the scourge of unwanted and fraudulent Robocalls.

The SIP Forum has announced that the United States Federal Communications Commission on July 13, 2017 voted 3-0 to approve an official Notice of Inquiry – WC Docket No. 17-97 seeking industry comment on the SIP Forum/ATIS SHAKEN Call Authentication Framework, which sets forth a comprehensive methodology for validating phone calls and mitigating Caller ID Spoofing and fraudulent Robocalling.

According to the FCC, Caller ID spoofing and the Robocalling it enables generate the largest number of consumer complaints to the FCC and to the Federal Trade Commission. U.S. consumers received an estimated 2.4 billion Robocalls per month in 2016. Furthermore, in a recent Notice of Proposed Rulemaking on Call Blocking, the FCC noted that illegal Robocalling activity continues to grow despite industry efforts and the protections provided by the Telephone Consumer Protection and Truth in Caller ID Act (TCPA).

Although call blocking is one tool for combating illegal Robocalls, an additional complementary task is to positively identify the bad actors making these calls. A procedure for authenticating calls between service providers aims to make it possible for subscribers and carriers to know that callers are who they say they are, reducing the risk of fraud and ensuring that callers can be held accountable for their calls.

According to Richard Shockey, SIP Forum Chairman and Principal of Shockey Consulting, “With this Notice of Inquiry (NOI), the FCC is taking a decisive step towards the goals of better protecting American consumers from the scourge of unwanted and fraudulent Robocalls. We are grateful that the FCC is taking corrective action in proposing industry adoption of the SHAKEN framework to help secure our telephone networks by facilitating use of methods to authenticate telephone calls and deter illegal Robocallers.”

“Caller ID Spoofing allows bad actors to hide their real, originating phone numbers, and to impersonate a trusted party such as a bank or the IRS, making it extremely difficult for consumers to know if a caller is legitimate or not. It also hampers…

Read the full article from the Source…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *