CHIPSA Hospital Files Patent on Cancer Immunotherapy Combination of Checkpoint Inhibitors and Coley Vaccine

Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors (source cancer.gov)

The immunology behind this combined approach, which yielded synergistic antitumor effects, is very interesting in that checkpoint inhibitors, such as Yervoy, Keytruda, and Opdivo act to stimulate the adaptive part of the immune system, whereas Coley’s Vaccine activates the innate immune system.

Preclinical and clinical data support efficacy of novel approach to cancer immunotherapy developed by CHIPSA hospital.

CHIPSA Hospital, dedicated to the accelerated development of nontoxic cancer immunotherapies announced today filing of a patent application covering the combination of FDA approved antibodies known as “checkpoint inhibitors” together with Coley Vaccine, a stimulatory of innate immunity. CHIPSA is the only licensed hospital facility (under doctor supervision) treating with the Coley’s Vaccine in North America.  The patent was based on animal data using the established B16 melanoma mouse model, as well as patient cases.

“CHIPSA is one of the oldest hospitals to be using Coley’s Vaccine therapy.  Our experiences and published literature suggests that Coley’s Vaccine is one of the most potent activators of the innate immune system[1],[2].  Given that cellular components of the innate immune system such as macrophage and dendritic cells play a fundamental role in the visibility of cancer to the immune system, we believe that activating these cells with Coley’s will increase responsiveness to checkpoint inhibitors.  This belief is supported by animal experiments and pilot human studies.” Said Edward Clay, Former CEO of CHIPSA Hospital and now Chief Executive of United Cancer Centers, as well as coinventor of the patent.

Currently, only about 20% of patients with advanced cancer respond to checkpoint inhibitors.  Data generated by CHIPSA collaborators and published data suggests that stimulating the innate immune system makes tumors more visible to the adaptive immune system, thus potentially increasing the number of patients responding to checkpoint inhibitors.

“The immunology behind this combined approach, which yielded synergistic antitumor effects, is very interesting in that checkpoint inhibitors, such as Yervoy, Keytruda, and…

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