Meghan Cameron didn’t go out looking to break barriers. Instead, Sporting Kansas City coach Peter Vermes came to her.

Cameron is settling into her job as assistant director of player personnel with Sporting, the first woman to manage player contracts, salary budget, and acquisitions for a Major League Soccer team.

Her role will move into another uncharted area for a woman in MLS: She’ll evaluate prospective players for Vermes, as well as for the Swope Park Rangers and the organization’s academy.

“Peter Vermes just called me,” the longtime MLS front office executive said about her new job’s genesis. “Obviously it’s humbling to be the first. But for me it doesn’t matter if I’m the first or the last or the 101st. Peter called me to do a job, it wasn’t because I’m a female. He knew what I could bring to the table. I do hope this opens the doors for others moving on, but I don’t consider myself a trailblazer. I’m just doing a job.”

Like all coaches, Cameron said Vermes has specific ideas about player characteristics and qualities. Cameron will be working with Director of Player Personnel Brian Bliss.

“The plan is that I’ll be learning what it is in each position that they’re looking for in players so that I can assist in the scouting side as well,” she said.

Cameron’s new job with Sporting — she started last month — comes as women are taking on greater roles in pro soccer in the United States and abroad. And not just with women’s teams.

Two women — Kathy Carter and former national team goalkeeper Hope Solo — are among the eight candidates running for president of the U.S. Soccer Federation. Only four countries — Liberia, Turks and Caicos, Burundi, and Sierra Leone — have ever elected a woman to head their soccer federation.

Chan Yuen-ting became the first female coach to lead a men’s team to a title in a top-flight league in 2016 when she guided Eastern Sports Club to the Hong Kong Premier League championship.

Corinne Diacre served as manager (coach) of a second-division French men’s team, Clermont Foot, for…