Award-Winning Documentary Narrated by Harrison Ford Links Exposure to Harmful Algal Blooms to Increased Risk of ALS

Dr. Paul Alan Cox, Harrison Ford, Marianne Landin, and Bo Landin attended the screening of “Toxic Puzzle” in Jackson Hole, Wyoming.

“Our research demonstrates a close link between environmental health and human health,” said Dr. Cox. “In this, water quality is a key issue. Cyanobacteria thrive on nitrogen and phosphorous from agricultural and sewage inputs.”

Harrison Ford attended the Jackson Hole premiere of “Toxic Puzzle – Hunt for the Hidden Killer” on July 31, 2017 at the Center for the Arts in Jackson, Wyoming.

Directed by Scandinature Films’ Bo Landin and narrated by Ford, the award-winning documentary film portrays the efforts of ethnobotanist Paul Alan Cox and his team at Brain Chemistry Labs (BCL), a nonprofit research consortium in Jackson, Wyoming, to find and fight environmental triggers for neurodegenerative illnesses. It explores a role for toxins in the environment — including those produced by cyanobacteria in algal blooms — as possible triggers for ALS and Alzheimer’s disease.

“Our research demonstrates a close link between environmental health and human health,” said Dr. Cox, who participated in a Q&A session after the screening. “In this, water quality is a key issue. Cyanobacteria thrive on nitrogen and phosphorous from agricultural and sewage inputs.”

“This is a medical detective story, and I have been amazed to see how a small laboratory in Jackson Hole is taking the lead with a global team of 50 scientists. While scientific revelations abound, I am also impressed by the dedication of these scientists, who put the patients and their families afflicted with these serious diseases first. It helps to build an emotional story that will grab viewers around the world,” Bo Landin told the audience.

Also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, ALS is a fatal and rapid neurodegenerative disease. While there is no known cure for either ALS or Alzheimer’s disease, the Jackson lab and their colleagues are evaluating a new drug candidate, now in a Phase II clinical trial for Alzheimer’s at Dartmouth Medical School, which was also approved for Phase II clinical trials for ALS as a means of slowing disease progression.

The hunt for a trigger and cure began in Guam, where…

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