Audits show lax oversight by Wisconsin agency counting Foxconn jobs

CHICAGO (Reuters) – The Wisconsin agency tasked with holding Foxconn accountable for delivering up to 13,000 jobs in exchange for $1.5 billion in state payroll tax credits has a history of failing to verify job-creation claims and rewarding companies that fall short of quotas, according to state audits.

The deal to secure Foxconn’s proposed LCD screen plant announced late last month is one of the largest economic development agreements in U.S. history and counts President Donald Trump, who rode into office on promises of creating manufacturing jobs, as one of its proponents.

A May audit found the Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation (WEDC) did not independently verify jobs numbers claimed by recipients of tax credits and posted inaccurate jobs figures online. Earlier such reports by the non-partisan Legislative Audit Bureau identified similar shortcomings in 2013 and 2015.

The agency intends to hire more staff to help manage the Foxconn project and is “committed to providing the highest level of transparency, accountability and accuracy in all of its awards,” spokesman Mark Maley said.

The deal with Taiwan’s Foxconn, formally known as Hon Hai Precision Industry Co Ltd, and an unrelated announcement last week by Toyota that it would build a $1.6 billion plant in a yet-to-be-specified state placed renewed focus on tax-funded development deals.

State and local governments since 1976 have awarded at least $105 billion in tax subsidies for corporate headquarter relocations, plant expansions and other developments, according to watchdog group Good Jobs First.

Critics say the subsidies often fail to produce promised economic growth and jobs, yet oversight typically is light and states rarely claw back benefits when companies do not meet commitments.

Indeed, some of the highest-profile deals between manufacturers and U.S. states have a spotty track record of long-term job creation.

Boeing Co has shed nearly 16,000 jobs in Washington state since winning the largest share of a 16-year, $8.7 billion incentive package, and cut nearly 1,200 jobs in South Carolina after securing multimillion-dollar incentives there.

“States should always be skeptical of any job projections. That’s why incentives should contain provisions to limit the costs per job-year, and to claw back incentives if a company leaves,” said Tim Bartik, senior economist with the Kalamazoo, Michigan-based W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.

The WEDC, formed in 2011…

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