Astronomers solve mystery of ‘new star’ spotted in 1437 AD – Technology & Science

On a spring night in 1437 AD, something unusual happened — Korean astronomers spotted a new star in the sky above Seoul. Two weeks later, they reported, it vanished again.

Now scientists have finally tracked down the object behind that temporary sparkle in the sky, offering a new glimpse into the hidden lives of stars, and how they evolve through different stages of their lives.

The new star was a nova (a word that literally means new star) or stellar eruption that appeared in the tail of the constellation known in the western world as Scorpio.

Canadian astronomer Michael Shara began looking for the source of the ancient nova more than 30 years ago. He has finally found it, he reports in a paper published Wednesday in the journal Nature.

A star map published by Chinese scientist Su Song in 1092 shows the constellations in a sky divided into lunar mansions. The researchers used ancient Chinese maps sky maps to figure where the nova would have been located in the sky. (Public domain/Wikimedia Commons)

Shara, an astrophysics curator at the American Museum of Natural History who was born and raised in Montreal, became interested in the story of the mysterious Korean star back in 1986. The fact that it appeared and then disappeared in 14 days suggested it was a classical nova, sudden brightening of a star that isn’t as intense or long lasting as a supernova or star explosion.

What excited Shara was the Korean astronomers had provided a lot of details that should allow astronomers to figure exactly where in the sky that nova had appeared.

It was spotted above Seoul on March 11, 1437, they reported, between the second and third star of a part of the sky that eastern astronomers call the sixth lunar mansion. That would have been very near the horizon.

The problem was, Shara said, “there’s no good map from the Koreans which points at the sky or shows you the constellations and tells you which is second star and which is the third.”

Historian help

Shara enlisted the help of Richard Stephenson, a historian of ancient Asian astronomical records at Durham University in England. By looking at Chinese maps, which also divide the sky into lunar mansions, Stephenson managed to pinpoint where he thought the star that caused the nova should be located.

The recovered nova of March 11, 1437 and its ejected shell. The star that produced the nova shell is indicated with red tick marks; it is far from the shell’s centre today. However, its…

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