Arctic Ocean thaw helps Russian shipping as old ice blows west

OSLO (Reuters) – Russian shipping in the Arctic is benefiting from winds that are driving the oldest and thickest sea ice towards North America, further opening a remote region that is thawing amid global warming, scientists say.

The thinning Russian ice could help liquefied natural gas (LNG) tankers, due to start exports from Russia’s Yamal Peninsula in late 2017, to navigate an icy route east to Asia for more than a planned six months of the year, they said.

Almost all attention on Arctic shipping has focused on how global warming is shrinking the extent of ice around the North Pole, opening a summertime short-cut route between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans.

But little-noticed shifts in the age of the ice, driven by prevailing winds and currents, are also helping Russia.

“Winds are blowing the ice out of the Northern Sea Route along the coast of Russia” and towards North America, said Jeremy Mathis, Director of the Arctic Research Program at the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

NOAA maps show that almost all the ice near Russia in winter is now only a year old and typically up to about 2 metres (6 feet 6 inches) thick, with older and more jagged ice concentrated towards North America.

By contrast, in 1985, ice older than five years was found across the Arctic Ocean, NOAA data show. Old ice can build up into hull-tearing ridges perhaps 20 metres thick.

“The old ice is like a bar of butter straight out of the freezer, hard as rock. The new ice is like warm butter – you can put a knife through it,” said Robert Corell, a leading U.S. Arctic expert at the Global Environment & Technology Foundation.

“Russia will benefit most in coming years,” he said, because the younger ice will allow ships including LNG tankers to navigate for ever longer between Asia and Europe. The Arctic Ocean is widely predicted to be ice-free in summertime by 2050.

So far, most traffic on the Russian coast is between Russian Arctic ports or opening exports from Russia of goods such as oil and gas, metals, fertilisers, coal and timber.

FILE PHOTO: The Christophe de Margerie, an ice-class tanker fitted out to transport liquefied natural gas, is docked in Arctic port of Sabetta, Yamalo-Nenets district, Russia March 30, 2017.Olesya Astakhova/File Photo

For a Graphic on Arctic shipping routes click tmsnrt.rs/2uuQjlm

Lng Test

In March, the Christophe de Margerie, the first ice-breaking LNG tanker built for Russia’s Sovcomflot (SCF), docked at the Arctic port…

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