Archaeologists uncover the lost Royal palace of Henry VIII

Archaeologists in London have uncovered the remains of Greenwich Palace, the birthplace of Henry VIII and Elizabeth I.

The palace, which once stood on the site now occupied by the Old Royal Naval College, has been revealing some of its secrets. Two rooms from the Tudor-era palace were found when the ground beneath the Old Royal Naval College’s Painted Hall was being prepared for a new visitor center.

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William Palin, director of conservation at the Old Royal Naval College told Fox News experts have excavated a tiled floor measuring 16.4 feet by 10 feet, and more than 6 feet beneath that, a brick cellar with round headed niches, an “immaculate” brick floor and the remnants of an arched vault. “This is a highly significant discovery, given the extent of the archaeology and the good condition of the remains,” he explained, via email. “As work continues on analysing the remains it is hoped that they will offer rich and valuable information on the working of the palace.”

The palace was built on the south bank of the Thames Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, in 1426 and rebuilt by Henry VII between 1500 and 1506. It was demolished at the end of the seventeenth century to make way for the Royal Hospital for Seamen, which later became the Royal Naval College. The location, which ceased to be an officers’ training academy in 1997, is now the Old Royal Naval College, an important U.K. heritage site. Paintings show that the palace occupied much of the land where the Old Royal Naval College now stands.

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