Apple Seeing Steady Downloads, Adoption Of New Update

Apple just released the latest version of its iOS operating system and it’s seeing steady adoption rates from users. According to analytics company Mixpanel, around 16 percent of Apple users have already downloaded iOS 11 since its launch Tuesday.

At the moment, adoption rates for iOS 11 have fallen in line with past iOS releases. For last year’s release of iOS 10 according to Mixpanel, the update saw an adoption rate of around 15 percent a day after its release. Within two days, iOS 10 jumped to around 20 percent of compatible Apple devices.

As with past iOS releases, they’ve benefited from Apple’s ability to quickly push them out to users and a fairly thorough list of compatible devices. For iOS 11, users with devices up to the iPhone 5s or iPad mini 2 — which both came out in 2013 — can still receive the update. iOS 11 features standard performance and usability updates for Apple devices and has been headlined by new features including improved Siri functionality, the Do Not Disturb driving mode and upgraded file management support. While Apple Pay Cash was a similarly promoted feature during the leadup to the iOS 11 release, it’ll be included in an update later this fall.

iOS 11 hasn’t had major issues since its launch, but like with most major operating system releases, some growing pains between the update and other services are still being figured out.

Chief among them has been Apple’s redesign of the Control Center in iOS 11. The task bar has always had sections where you could toggle standard functions on and off, but while iOS 11 allows you to add additional function toggles, it also doesn’t entirely disable Wi-Fi or Bluetooth. Instead, the toggles will only partially disable them to prevent new connections from occurring, but won’t turn them off like in past iOS versions. Apple has suggested that this is to keep iOS features like AirPlay and AirDrop — which both use Wi-Fi and Bluetooth — working smoothly, though it’s possible to disable them entirely when you go through the Settings app.

Users with large app libraries could also have similar reasons for holding off on the update. With iOS 11, Apple finally migrated entirely to 64-bit app support, meaning that older apps based on the existing software architecture won’t work at all. For most users and developers, the move has long been in the works. Since the start of the year, Apple has given warnings when users try to open 32-bit-based apps and many developers…

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