AGRM Member Rescue Missions Help Peers and Other Victims of Recent Hurricanes

A team from Nashville Rescue Mission assists in recovery efforts following storms in both Texas and Florida

The individuals who left the comforts of home and family to provide desperately needed help show the compassionate spirit within our rescue missions. Their ability to mobilize so quickly stems from the close-knit nature of our community, as well our direct urging for missions to help other missions.

Demonstrating that the worst of times often brings out the best in people, Association of Gospel Rescue Missions (AGRM) members from Indiana, Tennessee, Kentucky, Texas, and Arizona—among others—have traveled thousands of miles in recent weeks to help peers in hurricane-stricken communities. The relief effort provided critical back-up for local response teams overwhelmed by the widespread devastation along the Texas and Florida coasts, as well as inland areas.

Emergency help provided by the rescue mission teams ranged from cutting and removing fallen trees to tearing out damaged flooring and wall coverings, and from delivering food and clothing to cooking and relieving local mission staff members battling fatigue. All assistance was provided free of charge.

AGRM President John Ashmen praised the coordinated response. “The individuals who left the comforts of home and family to provide desperately needed help show the compassionate spirit within our rescue missions,” said the national faith-based leader. “Their ability to mobilize so quickly stems from the close-knit nature of our community, as well our direct urging for missions to help other missions deal with the impacts of the hurricanes.” He notes that AGRM member missions have daily experience in helping hungry, homeless, abused, and addicted people in crisis, which allows for an easy transition to helping in a natural disaster.

Following Hurricane Harvey’s destructive arrival in Texas, Nashville Rescue Mission immediately sent a four-person team that drove through the night to reach battered towns such as Port Arthur, Corpus Christi and Rockport, considered “ground zero.” Led by Senior Director of Operations Billy Eldridge, an experienced tree removal professional before joining the mission, the volunteer crew used chainsaws…

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