Across New York, a Summertime Tour of Public Art

Sheila Hicks

For several years the curator Cecilia Alemani has led an ambitious public art program for the High Line, and this year she has given over its northern stretches to the pioneering fiber artist Sheila Hicks, an American in Paris. For “Hop, Skip, Jump, and Fly: Escape From Gravity,” Ms. Hicks has laid down 200 meters of serpentine aluminum tubes wrapped in colorful, weatherproof textiles; green cylinders are camouflaged in the undergrowth, while brilliant blue loop-de-loops crawl out of the brush. As so often with Ms. Hicks, it’s her colors that make the strongest impact: The work’s scorching yellows and reds sneak up like snakes in the grass. The High Line, 30th Street and 11th Avenue, through March 2018.

Josiah McElheny

The sculptor and glassblower Josiah McElheny has plopped down three pavilions in Madison Square Park’s fenced-off central lawn; a green disc, a red arch and a blue baffle with circular cutouts that look like a giant Connect Four game board. They sit impassively during the day, but serve as stages for readings and performances all summer. This week, they welcome the Merce Cunningham Dance Company alumni Rashaun Mitchell and Silas Reiner, whose performers were flexing their spines and executing some tentative caprioles when I visited at dusk a few nights ago. Regrettably, whatever force Mr. McElheny’s pavilions have is vitiated by the park’s neurosis about the grass. Watching the dancers from behind the waist-height fence, I felt as if I were at the zoo. Madison Square Park, 25th Street and Fifth Avenue, through Oct. 8.

Photo

Marilyn Minter’s “Resist” flag atop the headquarters of Creative Time.

Credit
Philip Greenberg for The New York Times

Marilyn Minter

Stand outside Phebe’s, the bar beloved by New York University students on the corner of Fourth Street and the Bowery, and crane your neck toward the building opposite. The headquarters of Creative Time, the public art group, has invited artists to fly a flag from its rooftop for its serial exhibition “Pledge of Allegiance” — and its first participant, the painter Marilyn Minter, has raised a drippy standard whose fluorescent letters spell RESIST. Subtle? Not especially. But hoisting any flag is no act of resignation, and Ms. Minter got into the spirit of the exercise, viewing the public sphere as in a state of…

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